Jump to content


Photo

Home Schooling


  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 Chaim613

Chaim613

    Member

  • Members
  • 75 posts

Posted 06 August 2012 - 07:53 AM

I would like to get Rabbi Shapiro's view on home schooling. Do you see it as a good thing in your experience? Do the kids flourish socially still? Is there a difference with home schooling in the pre-school/ elementary years as opposed to high school?

If it is a good thing, are there ways to avoid the pressure that everyone puts on you telling you that "you're crazy" for doing it? Obviously if its the right thing to do, the adult peer pressure is irrelevant, but was just curious if there was a good response.

thank you,
Chaim

#2 Rabbi Shapiro

Rabbi Shapiro

    Member

  • Administrators
  • 1,423 posts

Posted 06 August 2012 - 01:07 PM

I am not qualified to have an opinion on this topic. But I will give you the name of someone who is: Dr. Aharon Hersh Fried. Because of privacy concerns I can’t explain in public why I am recommending him specifically, but if you speak to him you will understand.

That said, there is one thing I will mention. Sometimes, the Hashkafos of the local schools, or the environment therein are not what you would like for your children.

If the only schools available to you for whatever reason teach improper Hashkafos or they will expose your children to undue bad influence, homeschooling is definitely the better choice.

(On the other hand, I have known some parents who want to homeschool the children because the Yeshivos are "too frum" and the parents have their own deviant Hashkafos and/or lifestyle. These parents are afraid that if the children attend Yeshiva they will be enlightened as to the impious atmosphere in the home. In such a case, we should do all we can to ensure that these children end up in Yeshiva.)

There are also legal constraints on homeschooling, which vary by state.

As far as what to say to people, that depends on why you are doing it. Is it because the local schools are inadequate? Or because you feel homeschooling is in general a better idea? If it's the first, you can say so. and people will probably understand. If it is the latter, you'll have a hard time convincing people. If that's the case, you'll have to just follow what you believe and tell people you're doing that.

#3 Nesanelf99

Nesanelf99

    Member

  • Members
  • 5 posts

Posted 08 May 2013 - 01:43 PM

I personally homeschool and believe it was the right choice for myself. I think it varies between each parent or child. If you would want your child to attend an online school for secular studies and would not want them to associate with non Jewish friends who attend the same school then I believe it is not fair to put your child through that. Looking at it from a purely spiritual side homeschooling can be the ideal situation for working on yourself and character without the feeling of restraint or bandwagon when with a group of friends. As "yeshivish" or proper a school or yeshiva can be the students will always act improperly at some point. I'm 14 and last year you might imagine that most of my classmates and friends changed quite a bit and got a bit crude and immature and frankly very inappropriate. I (sadly) found myself changing with them (at the beginning I tried very hard not to but when your around these people constantly it happens) and I wasn't happy with that. I find myself being a much better person homeschooling and much more in control of myself. This has been the step I needed to have the freedom to refine my middos and learning and davening. The downside however is that almost every kid or teen needs social interaction and friends. If parents decided that they want their child to homeschool then they either need to make sure there are many friends in the neighborhood that s/he can befriend or allow them to make friends that possibly aren't Jewish or else they WILL go insane. I understand I'm not a Rabbi or anything so I'm not really in any position to tell you what to do but these have been my firsthand experiences...