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Who Can A Kohen Not Marry?


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#1 danceInTheRain

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Posted 19 September 2012 - 04:12 PM

please be as specific as possible and appropriate.

#2 Rabbi Shapiro

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Posted 19 September 2012 - 06:37 PM

A divorcee; a woman who went through Chalitzah; a convert, a woman whose father is not Jewish; a woman who had relations with someone that is prohibited for her to marry (for example, a non-Jew); a woman who had been kidnapped (שבויה); or a woman whose father was a Kohen and mother was any one of the above.

#3 Menorah

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Posted 19 September 2012 - 10:12 PM

If a Kohen's wife is attacked, must he divorce her?

#4 danceInTheRain

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 12:56 PM

kidnapped?
why would that make any difference?

#5 rali

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 05:43 PM

What about the daughter of a woman who converted?

#6 Ellie

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 12:25 AM

So the girl doesn't have to be a virgin as long as the guy was permissible for her to marry?

#7 Rabbi Shapiro

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 01:43 PM

kidnapped?
why would that make any difference?

Because we are concerned that something happened while she was in captivity. In fact, if a woman in kidnapped not for ransom but because they want to kill her, and then she was rescued, she is prohibited to her husband even if he is not a Kohen, because we are concerned that she gave herself willingly in order to save her life.

#8 Rabbi Shapiro

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 01:45 PM

So the girl doesn't have to be a virgin as long as the guy was permissible for her to marry?

Correct.

#9 Rabbi Shapiro

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 01:46 PM

What about the daughter of a woman who converted?

I had mentioned "...or a woman whose father was a Kohen and mother was any one of the above."

#10 Rabbi Shapiro

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 01:49 PM

If a Kohen's wife is attacked, must he divorce her?

Yes. But only after we have Halahcic proof that it happened (or if he believes it on his own).

#11 Menorah

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 04:37 PM

Yes. But only after we have Halahcic proof that it happened (or if he believes it on his own).

If his wife tells him it happened, can he disbelieve it? And should she tell him it happened, if it did?

What if she files a police complaint against the perpetrator; can the husband still realistically/halachicly disbelieve it?

#12 Menorah

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 04:41 PM

Isn't it difficult for a young Kohen to get remarried after he divorces his wife? The Kohen cannot marry a divorced woman and very few never-married girls would consider marrying someone who is divorced. That mainly leaves widows, and there aren't that many young ones (and those that are around, often will marry non-Kohanim.)

#13 Rabbi Shapiro

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 10:41 AM

Isn't it difficult for a young Kohen to get remarried after he divorces his wife? The Kohen cannot marry a divorced woman and very few never-married girls would consider marrying someone who is divorced. That mainly leaves widows, and there aren't that many young ones (and those that are around, often will marry non-Kohanim.)

Yes.

#14 Rabbi Shapiro

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 10:41 AM

If his wife tells him it happened, can he disbelieve it? And should she tell him it happened, if it did?

What if she files a police complaint against the perpetrator; can the husband still realistically/halachicly disbelieve it?

Yes, he can still disbelieve it.

#15 Menorah

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 04:58 PM

Yes, he can still disbelieve it.

All it requires is his verbal statement of disbelief? Or must he sincerely, in his heart, believe it never happened?

#16 Menorah

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 05:00 PM

Does the same principle apply in regards when a wife committed adultery? The husband can disbelieve it and remain married to her (if he so chooses)? [If he cannot do so, why is it different than the case of a Kohen?]

#17 Rabbi Shapiro

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 06:08 PM

All it requires is his verbal statement of disbelief? Or must he sincerely, in his heart, believe it never happened?

It requires that he really disbelieve it.

#18 Rabbi Shapiro

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 07:44 AM

Does the same principle apply in regards when a wife committed adultery? The husband can disbelieve it and remain married to her (if he so chooses)? [If he cannot do so, why is it different than the case of a Kohen?]

Well if he doesn't believe it, and there is no Halachic evidence that it happened, then why should he think he needs to divorce her?

#19 danceInTheRain

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 08:13 AM

in the case of the kohen:
what if the women was kidnapped but we know who the kidnapper is and he is man that she would be allowed to marry? Are we still afraid?

#20 Rabbi Shapiro

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 03:38 PM

in the case of the kohen:
what if the women was kidnapped but we know who the kidnapper is and he is man that she would be allowed to marry? Are we still afraid?

Usually not. We would be afraid in a case where a married woman was captured not for ransom but to be killed. In such a case we would be afraid that she gave herself to her captor willingly in order to save her life. That would prohibit her to her husband, even if her captor was Jewish.