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#1 FS613

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 02:26 PM

L'Chvod Rabbi Shapiro, Shlita:

 

I see in the Siddur that the Kof in "Kol," meaning "All," is spelled in some Psukim/Brochos with a Cholam and in other Psukim/Brochos with a Kamatz.

Why is this? Does the change in vowel have a different effect on the meaning/context of the word?

 

Thank you.

 



#2 Rabbi Shapiro

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 08:06 PM

They both mean the same thing. But there's a rule in דקדוק that a hard vowel sound ("תנועה גדולה") becomes a soft vowel sound ("תנועה קטנה") when the word is the beginning of a phrase ("סמיכות"). For example: The word שָֹכָר, ("sachar") which means "reward" (note the kamatz under the ש - as in בָּרוּךְ מְשַׁלֵּם שָֹכָר טוֹב לִירֵאָיו), loses the "Kamatz" when it is part of a phrase, such as "schar Mitzvah" (as in "schar Mitzvah Mitzvah"). Another example: "Bird's nest" in Loshon HaKodesh is "kein" - with a tzeiri, not "kan" with a segol. But in the phrase " קַן צִפּוֹר" the tzeiri becomes a pasach. (People's referring to the Mitzvah as "shiluach Hakan" is technically grammatically incorrect. The Mitzvah would be called "Shiluach HaKein," and the reason people call it "kan" is because in the Torah the word is part of a phrase so it is pronounced "kan.")

 

The difference between כָל and כֹּל is like that too. כֹּל is a "hard sound" and כָל is the soft sound. When the word כל is the beginning of a phrase, it gets the soft sound, as is בְּכָל לְבָבְךָ וּבְכָל נַפְשֶׁךָ. But when the word כל is not the beginning of an independent phrase, it becomes  כֹּל, as in וְאַתָּה מוֹשֵׁל בַּכֹּל or כִּי כֹל בַּשָּׁמַיִם וּבָאָרֶץ.

 

I suppose you can condense the difference between כֹּל and כָל by saying כֹּל means "everything" and כָל means "all of...". The idea is that  כָל always is the beginning of a phrase.

 

 

 
 
 
 


#3 AYidOnTheWayUp

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 02:37 PM

Rabbi Shapiro, where can one learn dikduk? Not looking for a 400 hundred page sefer but more something short sweet and to the point. I learn all the dikduk Rashis with the artscroll chumash but I feel like its in one ear out the other. I really want to know dikduk.



#4 emoticon

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 09:55 PM

I would suggest looking at some of the Dikduk workbooks that are put out for seventh/eighth grades.

Torah Umesorah also has some pretty good materials.

הצלחה!



#5 FS613

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 09:38 PM

So Kol with a Cholam (pronounced "Coal") means "all" or "everthing,"

 

and Kol with a Kamatz (pronounced "Cull") means "all of" ?

 

As "Tfila" means "prayer," and "Tfilas" means "prayer of" ?



#6 Rabbi Shapiro

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 10:46 PM

So Kol with a Cholam (pronounced "Coal") means "all" or "everthing,"

 

and Kol with a Kamatz (pronounced "Cull") means "all of" ?

 

As "Tfila" means "prayer," and "Tfilas" means "prayer of" ?

Yes.